Archaeology

The Romano British Cemetery

The Romano British Cemetery

The Roman way of death.

In 1990, the Otford & District Historical and Archaeological Society, carried out a series of digs at Frog Farm. They revealed a total of 74 cremation burials, most placed in earthenware Patch Grove pots. It remains the largest group of Patch Grove ware cinerary urns known in Kent.

Due to local erosion and ploughing, all the graves appear quite shallow, buried mostly about 500cm from the surface. The remains appear generally to date from 150-250AD. The foundations of an octagonal mausoleum, constructed toward late 300AD, were also discovered on site.

 

The Bronze Age Mount

Their memory lives on

The Bronze Age Mount

Iron-Age Hill Fort

A great hill-fort overlooking the valley

Iron-Age Hill Fort

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The Romano British Cemetery

The Roman way of death

The Romano British Cemetery

Progress Villa

Unearthing a Roman farm

Progress Villa

The Pottery Field

Discvery of local industry

The Pottery Field

The Palace & Becket's Well

A palace and a holy well

The Palace & Becket's Well

Church Field Villa

One of the earliest British centres of Christian worship

Church Field Villa

The Bronze Age Mount

Their memory lives on

The Bronze Age Mount

.

The Romano British Cemetery

The Roman way of death

The Romano British Cemetry

Progress Villa

Unearthing a Roman farm

Progress Villa

Pottery Field

Discvery of local industry

Pottery Field

The Palace & Becket's Well

A palace and a holy well

The Palace & Becket's Well

Church Field Villa

One of the earliest British centres of Christian worship

Church Field Villa